Emergence of self-regulation (1): Introduction

Self regulation, PNG

The self-regulating dynamic of the energy-state of the System consists of seven components.

In a series of articles on this blog I present my latest paper with the title “Emergence of self-regulation”. In this paper I explain how self-regulation of the energy-state of the System ’emerged’ in the System.

Emergence refers to the phenomenon whereby larger structures and regularities arise in a system through the interactions among its parts (basic elements); the larger structures – the self-regulating dynamic at the macro level of the System in this particular case – have properties that the parts (individual human beings in this case) do not have.

ABSTRACT

During the period 1495-1945, the ‘sum’ of individual efforts to fulfil basic requirements to survive as human beings, and the ‘grouping’ of human beings in communities to support these efforts, produced a self-organized – emergent – self-regulating dynamic, by which the energy-state of the System was regulated. This self-regulated dynamic resulted in the implementation of a next level of social integration and expansion, the moment the emergent regulation reached its limits, and consequently collapsed. By means of the fourth systemic war (the Second World War, 1939-1945), the System (in Europe) implemented dedicated hierarchies and emergent self-regulation was replaced by a deliberate human-controlled ‘management process’. The finite-time singularity dynamic accompanied by four accelerating war cycles, was the manifestation of the emergent self-regulating dynamic of the System, during the period 1495-1945. The emergence of the self-regulating dynamic can be attributed a number of conditions/factors, to physical laws and mechanisms that apply to the System’s dynamics, and to tensions (energy) that were produced. The self-regulating dynamic optimised the collective survival changes of the communities that made up the System, and of which the individuals were integral parts (members).

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT

The emergence of a self-reinforcing regulatory dynamic in the anarchistic System during the period 1495-1945, which was instrumental in the survival of its components (individuals and communities), shows how social systems produce(d) a next level of social integration and expansion; a next level of organisation and complexity.

Self-regulation at macro-level (the level of the System), was produced through a combination of (1) a number of conditions (including: the size of the System, interactions between its components (communities) with a certain minimum frequency and intension, (2) a multitude of micro-interactions between parts of the System (individual human beings and communities) that were motivated by an urge to survive and the need to fulfil a number of basic requirements to achieve this, and (3) physical laws and mechanisms that apply to the energy (tensions) that were produced in the process, and the dynamics of the System.

By means of this regulatory macro-dynamic the System regulated its energy-state and optimised the survival changes of competing communities in the anarchistic system. The emergent regulatory dynamic at macro-level that ensured the survival of communities, can be considered the collective manifestation of the urge to survive of individuals that make up these communities. The ‘construction’ of the emergent regulatory dynamic shows how the urge to survive of individual human beings, shaped the behaviour of the System at a next level of organisation (complexity), and how the sum of individual efforts to survive also restrained the behaviour – the war dynamics – of communities (states) in the System.

 

INTRODUCTION

During the period 1495-1945, Europe developed from a collection of circa 300 loosely connected and diverse communities[1] (with different organisational arrangements) and a total population of 83 million (in 1495), into a tightly connected system of circa 25 highly interdependent and standardized state-structures, with a total population of circa 544 million (in 1939). A finite-time singularity dynamic accompanied by four accelerating war cycles was instrumental in this process of social integration and expansion (1), (2).

During the period 1495-1939, Europe constituted the core of the System and dominated the System’s (war) dynamics. In 1939, when the System reached the critical connectivity threshold and produced infinite amounts of tensions (energy), the System (Europe) collapsed. Consequently, the System experienced a phase transition to a next level of social integration and expansion; the simultaneous implementation of dedicated hierarchies in Europe, and a first international order at a global scale of the System[2].

During the period 1495-1945, the finite-time singularity dynamic and the four accelerating war cycles ensured that the energy-state of the System was regulated: The finite-time singularity dynamic and four accelerating war cycles constituted a self-organized – and emergent – self-regulating dynamic/mechanism.

Eventually – when in 1939 the System (Europe) reached the critical connectivity threshold and the System produced infinite amounts of tensions – the emergent self-regulatory dynamic of the System had reached its limits (the singularity in finite time), and the System collapsed. Consequently, by means of the fourth systemic war (the Second World War, 1939-1945), the System experienced a phase transition. Through the phase transition, emergent regulation of the energy state of the System was replaced by dedicated hierarchies, that ensured deliberate – human-controlled – regulation.

In this paper, I explain how the ‘sum’ of individual efforts – a multitude of micro-interactions – to fulfil their basic requirements to ensure their survival, produced an emergent self-regulating dynamic at macro-level of the System, that ensured that the collective survival changes of communities in the System were optimized. I also discuss why and how at a certain point, emergent self-regulation of the energy-state of the System was replaced by deliberate human control, by imposing dedicated hierarchies (non-anarchistic structures) that transcended state-structures.

[1] Communities are the basic elements – building blocks – of the System. Communities evolved into states. Communities consist of human-beings and groups.

[2] The fourth systemic war (the Second World War, 1939-1945) constituted a phase transition, in response to the collapse of the core (Europe), with two closely related effects: (1) in the core of the System (Europe) two non-anarchistic structures – two dedicated hierarchies – were implemented, controlled by the United States and the Soviet Union (respectively controlling West and East Europe), and (2) a first international order at a global scale of the System (the United Nations). The United States and the Soviet Union acted as lynchpins between both orders. Analysis of war data shows that currently the (now global) System is producing a fifth – a first global – war cycle, that could be the first war cycle of a second finite-time singularity dynamic at a global scale of the System.

To be continued.