And the winner is …. North Korea (at least for now).

North Korea has cunningly outmaneuvered the United States and has achieved another ‘victory’, with strategic implications for the Great Power dynamics of the System, not only on the Korean peninsula, but also at a global stage.

The current volatile politics and dynamics are typical for the stage of development of the current international order.

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I can be mistaken, it seems the North-Korean delegation has difficulty suppressing a broad smile (meeting today).

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Not a warm homecoming: Can Trump restrain himself?

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The security dilemma at display.

President Trump of the United States has caused enormous damage to American interests: Trump has systematically undermined his (domestic) political reputation and the already fragile international order. His positive achievements are meagre; a fact his bragging cannot disguise.

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Preorder Donald J. Trump’s new book now: “The Art of making Enemies”

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Trump is a master in creating ‘self-reinforcing diplomatic failure’

A self-reinforcing (positive feedback) mechanism is a mechanism that reinforces a certain effect, because of the ‘positive’ interplay between variables in a dynamical system.

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The urgent need for fundamental reform of the United Nations, part V: Creation of an International Panel on the Reform of the United Nations (IPRUN)

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President Trump addresses – blasts – the General Assembly of the United Nations to convince the assembly that nationalism should guide international relations: It seems he did not bother to read the Preamble of the United Nations Charter.

In the previous four parts of this series of articles, I argued that superficial reform – like streamlining the UN’s bureaucracy – will not suffice to solve the fundamental problems the current international order – the United Nations – now confronts.

Because of population growth, differentiated growth of states and rivalries between states in anarchistic systems, international orders require periodic reorganisation.

The problem is that international orders in anarchistic systems lack mechanisms to ‘upgrade’ an international by means of consultation and consensus.

In this article – the last article in this series – I argue that an International Panel on the Reform of the United Nations (IPRUN) must be established, in an effort to avoid a violent systemic crisis.

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